Admissions

P-MAP Curriculum

P-MAP students complete a master’s degree in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, which include a number of courses that are closely aligned, or taught in tandem, with the medical school curriculum. Students are taught by the same faculty that will be teaching them their core science courses during M1 and M2. Below is a list of courses currently required for the program.

SUMMER

CMM 510 Human Histology: An Introduction to Pathology (Pre-Session)

This course provides students with essential background in functional morphology of human tissues and organs. The instructor uses pathology examples to help illuminate normal structure and function. The mode of instruction is interactive lecture, including facilitated group study of virtual slides.

CMM 501 Human Gross Anatomy (Summer Session 1)

This course is an intensive, dissection-based survey of the gross structure of the human body. The course is intended for students preparing for careers in biomedical sciences, biology teaching or anthropology. Daily labs are student-directed opportunities for active learning and peer teaching. Exams are both practical and written. The pace, structure and content of this course require maturity, focus and collaboration for success.

CMM 504 Cell Biology of Disease (Summer Session 2)

This team-taught course is designed to provide a solid introduction to graduate-level cell biology with an emphasis on how key pathways contribute to human disease. The course format consists of discussion-oriented lectures on key concepts in cell biology, with each concept linked to specific diseases caused by dysregulation of the relevant pathways. Course topics are divided into broad cell biology themes with related diseases as “case studies” to illustrate the connection between cell biology and health. Contact hours include ~2/3 time used for lecture and ~1/3 time for group activities to integrate course material through discussion of journal papers, related histology/cell structure, and methods tutorials.

FALL

HPS 577 Sociocultural and Behavioral Aspects of Public Health

This course is an overview of significant social, cultural and behavioral issues related to public health. Major public health problems and the influences of sociocultural issues are analyzed in relation to health behavior. Readings, discussions, films, and class experiences/assignments focus on understanding the social and cultural issues that influence health-related behavior among specific populations in the southwestern U.S., North America and internationally.

CMM 579 Art of Scientific Discovery

Techniques of posing questions and solving puzzles encountered in scientific research, with emphasis on life sciences and mathematics. Requirements include use of all techniques in a semester-long research project and final paper.

CMM 605 Medical Immunology and Infectious Disease

This course will combine lectures from the UA medical curriculum with regular meetings with basic-science faculty to introduce students to the concepts of medical immunology and infectious disease. Students will gain knowledge of not only basic-science aspects of these highly interrelated topics, but also medical aspects of these topics that will be valuable in guiding translational research in this general area. This course provides a flexible learning format with less formal in-class instruction than traditional courses. Students will view course content in podcast format on their own (or with other students), and meet once per week as a class with faculty for group discussion and review of the content.

This course is part of the transition to medical school for P-MAP students as they are able to understand the quantity of content, along with the accelerated pace, that can be expected in the medical curriculum. The podcast lectures are videos of the lectures current medical students receive, and the fast pace is supplemented with the weekly in-class meetings.

CMM 696c E=MC2 Seminar (Part 1)

This seminar series will develop students' interpersonal, intrapersonal, thinking and reasoning, and science competencies outlined by the American Association of Medical Colleges (AAMC). Students will engage in a series of seminars, workshops, and activities covering topics on cultural competence, service orientation, oral and written communication, ethics, resiliency, scientific inquiry, reasoning and problem solving. Students will be assessed based on their attendance, participation, and final presentation or paper.

CMM 910 Thesis (Initial units)

Research for the master's thesis (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, or thesis writing). Maximum total credit permitted varies.

SPRING

PATH 515 Mechanisms of Human Disease

Biochemical, structural, and functional changes in cells, tissues, and organs, which cause and are caused by diseases. This course is designed for graduate students training for a career in biomedical research.

CPH 573A Basic Principles of Epidemiology

Course will introduce students to the basic concepts and principles of epidemiology and how these concepts are applicable for their own particular interests and careers in epidemiology related fields.

CMM 696c Scientific Writing

CMM 604 Current Topics in Translational Medicine

This course is geared towards understanding the link between current medical practice and our understanding of the underlying basic science. There will be a substantial writing component to this course. Students will attend a minimum of 10 hours of medical rounds with a physician and prepare 5 written assessments of the basic science relevant to the medical presentation. Students will meet regularly with course instructors to present and discuss the basic science background of the case. The final exam will consist of an 8-10 page (exclusive of references) research paper which will be a comprehensive analysis of a medical case, the basic science underlying our understanding of the disease and treatment, and the current gaps in the basic science understanding that could inform future treatments.

CMM 696c E=MC2 Seminar (Part 2)

This seminar series will develop students' interpersonal, intrapersonal, thinking and reasoning, and science competencies outlined by the American Association of Medical Colleges (AAMC). Students will engage in a series of seminars, workshops, and activities covering topics on cultural competence, service orientation, oral and written communication, ethics, resiliency, scientific inquiry, reasoning and problem solving. Students will be assessed based on their attendance, participation, and final presentation or paper.

CMM 910 Thesis (Remaining units)

Research for the master's thesis (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, or thesis writing). Maximum total credit permitted varies.

P-MAP students complete a master’s degree in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, which include a number of courses that are closely aligned, or taught in tandem, with the medical school curriculum. Students are taught by the same faculty that will be teaching them their core science courses during M1 and M2. Below is a list of courses currently required for the program.