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A Record Year: the 2016 State of the College Address

A Record Year: the 2016 State of the College Address

“I truly believe we are in a great position to transform academic medicine through our undergraduate medical education and training programs; through strategic interdisciplinary and collaborative research; by collaborating with our clinical partner; and by building a strong, engaged and informed faculty,” said University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson Dean Charles B. Cairns, MD, FACEP, FAHA, during the State of the College Address on August 31, 2016.

The College has had a record year in many respects. Among the successes, COM-T:
• had a record number of applications for the Class of 2020;
• have a record number of students – 135 – in the Class of 2020 due to a record yield rate among those accepted;
• 35 percent of students in the Class of 2020 are underrepresented minorities in medicine;
• had a record match rate on Match Day (97 percent);
• had a record number of faculty promotions (40);
• and have had a record year in research and innovation, including the $43-million Precision Medicine Initiative grant, which is not only the largest NIH grant in the history of...

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‘Advances in Aging’ Lectures Return to UA Health Sciences Central Tucson Location Sept. 12

Seniors, health-care professionals and others can come learn about the benefits of Tai Chi to healthy aging with Ruth Taylor-Piliae, PhD, RN, FAHA (pictured), who will speak at noon, Monday, Sept. 12, at the newly relocated University of Arizona Center on Aging’s Advances in Aging Lecture Series, which have a new time and locale.

The Advances in Aging lectures returned in August to Kiewit Auditorium in the UA Cancer Center, 1515 N. Campbell Ave., adjacent to Banner – University Medical Center Tucson. The lectures are free to the public. A light lunch is served. No registration is required. Each run from noon to 1 p.m.

The popular lecture series had been held since 2012 at the Behavioral Health Pavilion at Banner – University Medical Center South (formerly known as the University of Arizona Medical Center – South Campus).

Dr. Taylor-Piliae is a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholar and associate professor at the UA College of Nursing. Her clinical interests include cardiovascular disease prevention and risk factor reduction, Tai Chi exercise, physical activity among diverse groups of adults, falls and fall risk in stroke survivors,...

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‘Tame Your Pain...An Inside Look at Conventional and Alternative Therapies for Pain Management’ Subject of UA Arthritis Center Lecture, Sept. 7

“Tame Your Pain ... An Inside Look at Conventional and Alternative Therapies for Pain Management,” will be presented Wednesday, Sept. 7, 6-7:15 p.m., at Banner – University Medical Center Tucson, DuVal Auditorium, 1501 N. Campbell Ave., Tucson. The 75-minute presentation will include time for questions and answers.

More than 100 million Americans suffer from chronic pain at a cost of more than $600 billion a year in medical treatments and lost productivity. About a third of the population is affected by chronic pain; more people than are affected by heart disease, diabetes and cancer combined.

Pain alerts us that something is wrong, but when it persists for an extended period of time after healing it becomes chronic pain. Pain that fails to serve a protective function is pathological pain. Arthritis causes the most common types of pathological pain.

Pain in itself can be considered a disease, not just a symptom of a disease. Pain specialists identify the type of pain and tailor the therapy accordingly. There is no “one size fits all.” Most pain specialists will shy...

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New Chief of Hematology and Oncology at UA Health Sciences, a Noted Head and Neck Cancer Specialist, Looks Forward to ‘Homecoming’

Julie E. Bauman, MD, MPH, is no stranger to Tucson.

The renowned head and neck cancer specialist and physician-scientist, who starts Sept. 1 as a professor of medicine and the new chief of the Division of Hematology and Oncology at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson and the UA Cancer Center, is a 1985 graduate of Salpointe Catholic High School.

“For me, it’s a homecoming,” Dr. Bauman said. “I was raised in Tucson. The Southwest is my home, my community and my culture. I did my junior faculty experience nearby at the University of New Mexico Cancer Center and returning to a leadership position at a Southwestern cancer center in an underserved state seems like the natural step for me in terms of my service.”

She spent the past four years in Pittsburgh, where she was associate professor of medicine at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), co-leader of the UPCI Head and Neck Cancer Program, director of its Head and Neck and Thyroid Cancer Sections, and co-director of the Head and Neck Cancer Center of Excellence at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. She has been a...

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New National Guidelines for Valley Fever Treatment Led by UAHS Center Director

Updated guidelines for treating people infected with Valley Fever, a disease caused by a fungus that is common in the U.S. Southwest, have been produced by a panel of experts led by John N. Galgiani, MD, director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence at the University of Arizona Health Sciences.

The recommendations include suggested treatment options for pregnant women, patients who are immunocompromised and others who may have a higher risk of severe illness. In severe cases, the disease may spread from the lungs to the bones or the brain.

Dr. Galgiani, a UA professor of medicine, is the lead author of the “2016 Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Treatment of Coccidioidomycosis,” geared toward primary care physicians and recently published in the journal, Clinical Infectious Diseases.

Fungal Illness Endemic to Southwest

Coccidioidomycosis, or Valley Fever, is caused by the Coccidioides fungus. Found in soils of the U.S. Southwest, it causes infection when...

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New UA Pediatric Center of Excellence First in Southwest to Provide Patient Care, Education, Research in Underdiagnosed Disorder

WHAT:            New UA Pediatric Center of Excellence First in Southwest to Provide Patient Care, Education, Research in Underdiagnosed Disorder

WHY:               Grand Opening Celebration of the “Children’s Postinfectious Autoimmune Encephalopathy (CPAE) Center of Excellence at the UA Steele Children’s Research Center,” which is the first in the Southwest to bring clinical care, teaching, translational medicine and basic science research together to cure a spectrum of  neuropsychiatric disorders that historically have been misdiagnosed or undiagnosed in children.

WHEN:            TUESDAY, AUG. 30, 11 A.M. – 1 P.M.

WHERE:          Kiewit Auditorium, University of Arizona Cancer Center, 1515 N. Campbell Ave., Tucson, Ariz.

The University of Arizona Steele Children’s Research Center and Banner Children’s at Diamond Children’s Medical Center are celebrating the grand opening of a new pediatric center of excellence that is the first in the Southwest to bring clinical care, teaching, and  research together to treat a family...

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New UA Pediatric Center of Excellence First in Southwest to Provide Patient Care, Education, Research in Underdiagnosed Disorder

The University of Arizona Steele Children’s Research Center has established a new “center of excellence” that is the first in the Southwest to treat and conduct research into a family of acute-onset neuropsychiatric disorders that historically have been misdiagnosed or undiagnosed in children.

Patient services will be provided at Banner Children’s at Diamond Children’s Medical Center and research will be conducted at the Steele Center.

As part of the University of Arizona Health Sciences, the “Children’s Postinfectious Autoimmune Encephalopathy (CPAE) Center of Excellence at the UA Steele Children’s Research Center” is the first to implement a model of clinical care, teaching and research to treat and potentially cure a spectrum of postinfectious autoimmune encephalopathies, such as PANS (Pediatric Acute-onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome),...

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email heart@u.arizona.edu

Learn CPR with the Sarver Heart Center

Chest-compression-only CPR was developed at Sarver Heart Center and our students offer trainings for community groups, such as Mountain Vista Fire Department. Learn more and watch this video featuring Melissa Ludgate, MD, Class of 2016. Her teaching skills helped save a life more than once.

To schedule a training for your community group, please email heart@u.arizona.edu.  

Precision Medicine Has Applications for Pancreatic Cancer

A team led by University of Arizona researchers is taking a new, patient-directed approach to treating pancreatic cancer.

Rather than relying on conventional cell lines that have defined effective drug targets for other types of cancers, they are creating and sequencing cell lines from a cancer patient's own tissue.

Their results reveal that pancreatic tumors are more varied than previously thought and that drug sensitivity is unique to each patient, illustrating why recent efforts to boost "personalized medicine," such as the UA's Precision Medicine Initiative, are so important.

"Currently there are no targeted therapies directly against the hallmark mutations common in pancreatic cancer, and each patient-derived model we tested had its own unique therapeutic sensitivities," said Erik Knudsen, a member of the University of Arizona Cancer Center, professor of medicine at the UA College of Medicine - Tucson, and author of the...

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Reduced U.S. Cocaine and Methamphetamine Use Linked to Controls on Commercial Chemicals

Large reductions in the numbers of cocaine users and methamphetamine users in the United States—so far lasting approximately eight years—occurred in association with government efforts that limited access to two commercially produced chemicals, according to a University of Arizona-led study.

In December 2006, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration implemented federal regulations restricting access to sodium permanganate, a chemical essential to the manufacture of cocaine.

In March 2007, Mexico, the primary source for methamphetamine in the United States, closed a chemical company accused of illicitly importing more than 60 tons of pseudoephedrine, a methamphetamine precursor chemical.

“Cocaine and methamphetamine production for international markets requires access to massive amounts of legally manufactured chemicals,” said James Cunningham, PhD, a social epidemiologist with the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson. “Disrupting that access can be expected to disrupt the drugs’ availability and use.”

Cocaine use in the United...

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