News

UAMC, UA College of Medicine Adult Diabetes Program Recognized by ADA

The University of Arizona Medical Center’s adult diabetes education program, based in the Abrams Public Health Center adjacent to UAMC - South Campus, recently received recognition by the Education Recognition Program (ERP) of the American Diabetes Association. 

The UAMC - Diabetes Physician Offices there joins the Angel Wing for Children with Diabetes & Endocrine Disorders in achieving this honor. The Angel Wing for Children at UAMC - University Campus was awarded ADA ERP recognition for pediatric diabetes education in 2009. 

The recognition was awarded based on the program meeting ADA-endorsed National Standards for Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support programs. The ADA ERP is one of two certifying bodies deemed by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for Diabetes Self-Management...

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‘Osteoarthritis Under the Microscope,’ March 4

“Osteoarthritis Under the Microscope,” an inside look into the latest advances in prevention and treatment of the most common form of arthritis, will be presented Wednesday, March 4, 6-7:15 p.m., at Banner – University Medical Center Tucson (formerly University of Arizona Medical Center-University Campus), DuVal Auditorium (Room 2600), 1501 N. Campbell Ave., Tucson.

The pain and physical limitations caused by osteoarthritis affect nearly 27 million men, women and children, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, making it a significant disease. In this special presentation, University of Arizona Arthritis Center Director C. Kent Kwoh, MD, an internationally recognized expert in osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and other joint diseases, will discuss new information on the causes of osteoarthritis and how to prevent the disorder.

Dr. Kwoh will share how this complex condition involves not only the breakdown of cartilage in joints but also changes in the adjacent soft tissue...

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Longtime Cardiologist Dr. Frank I. Marcus to Present ‘Quit Digging Your Grave with a Knife and Fork,’ March 3 in Tucson, March 4 in Phoenix

Sticking to a diet and exercise program is easier said than done! With that in mind, cardiologist Frank I. Marcus, MD, of the University of Arizona Sarver Heart Center in Tucson, will discuss the consequences of the obesity epidemic during “Quit Digging Your Grave with a Knife and Fork,” in Tucson on Tuesday, March 3, at the UA College of Medicine – Tucson and in Phoenix on Wednesday, March 4, at the UA College of Medicine – Phoenix. The presentation is part of the bi-annual Donald K. Buffmire Visiting Lectureship in Medicine series sponsored by the Flinn Foundation.

Studies show that obesity is a worldwide epidemic that leads to several life-threatening conditions, including heart disease, diabetes and cancer. People are bombarded with messaging about high-calorie, less-expensive processed foods; couple that with increased time at the computer, including sedentary games, and the problem increases.

A professor of medicine and cardiology at the UA College of Medicine – Tucson, Dr. Marcus will discuss the challenges associated with the prevention of...

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Third Annual ‘ENT in the Desert’ Symposium Draws National Audience and Prominent Ear, Nose & Throat Surgeons to Tucson, Feb. 19-21

In just three years, the “ENT in the Desert: Updates in Otolaryngology Symposium,” hosted Feb. 19-21 at Loews Ventana Canyon Resort by the new Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson, has become one of the must-go events in the yearly calendar for otolarynogology and its related specialties. Course registrants include otolaryngologists from across the country, and this year’s event is expected to draw nearly 150 participants.

Officially launched in October 2014, otolaryngology is the first department created at the UA College of Medicine – Tucson since 1990. It’s already in the top 40 in NIH funding for otolaryngology and has earned top-30 rankings nationally as a specialty by U.S. News & World Report, most recently in 2013.

Later this week, UA Department of Otolaryngology  chair and Professor Alex Chiu, MD, will lead the three-day, CME-accredited event. Along with fellow course directors Stephen Goldstein, MD, FACS, director, Facial, Plastic and...

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Dr. Charles Cairns Promoted to Interim Dean of UA College of Medicine – Tucson

Charles B. Cairns, MD, FACEP, FAHA, who has served as vice dean of the UA College of Medicine – Tucson since September, has been promoted to interim dean of the college, effective Feb. 16, 2015. 

Joe G.N. “Skip” Garcia, MD, UA senior vice president for health sciences, who has served as interim dean of the UA College of Medicine – Tucson since March 2014, returns full time as UA senior vice president for health sciences, a position he has held since September 2013. A national search for a permanent dean is expected to launch in fall 2015.

Dr. Cairns, who will continue to report to Dr. Garcia, also serves as assistant vice president for clinical research and clinical trials at the Arizona Health Sciences Center. In addition to being an accomplished health administrator, Dr. Cairns is a nationally recognized leader in emergency and critical care research and a professor in the UA Department of Emergency Medicine.

"I am honored to take on this important position at this key time in the evolution of the UA College of Medicine – Tucson, especially in contemplation of the new clinical partnership with Banner Health,” Dr. Cairns said. “I look forward...

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Five Ways to Reduce Heart Attack Risk by 80 Percent

If you could do five things to reduce your heart-attack risk by 80 percent, would you take a step to start on this path?

That was a challenge posed by Nancy K. Sweitzer, MD, PhD, as she opened the University of Arizona Sarver Heart Center’s Healthy Heart Day 2015. She cited a study from Sweden’s Karolinska Institute, which observed 20,721 healthy Swedish men, ages 45 to 79, for 11 years.

The study, published in Journal of the American College of Cardiology, noted that men could reduce their heart attack risk by 80 percent if they made five lifestyle changes. “I believe these also apply to women and Americans,” said Dr. Sweitzer, who is director of the UA Sarver Heart Center and chief of cardiology.

The five recommended changes and their heart attack risk reduction:

Not smoking results in a 36 percentage risk reduction. Eating a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts, reduced-fat dairy products, whole grains and fish results in an 18 percent... [read more]

Students from The Gregory School Host Valentine’s Day Party for Patients

WHAT:  Students from The Gregory School Host Valentine’s Day Party for Patients

WHEN:  FRIDAY, FEB 13, 2:30 P.M.

WHERE: The University of Arizona Medical Center – Diamond Children’s, 1501 N. Campbell Ave. (fourth floor lobby)

Students from The Gregory School (formerly known as St. Gregory College Preparatory School), will host a Valentine’s Day party for patients at Diamond Children’s on Friday, Feb. 13, 2:30 p.m.

The students will set up a photo booth for patients to get their photo taken, and assist patients in making Valentine’s Day cards with the photos for their friends and family.
 

Students from Emily Gray Junior High School Donate Valentine’s Day Teddy Bears to Diamond Children’s

WHAT:  Students from Emily Gray Junior High School Donate Valentine’s Day Teddy Bears to Diamond Children’s

WHEN:  FRIDAY, FEB 13, 10 A.M.

WHERE: The University of Arizona Medical Center – Diamond Children’s, 1501 N. Campbell Ave. (Lobby)

Students from Emily Gray Junior High School, will donate Valentine’s Day teddy bears to Diamond Children’s on Friday, Feb. 13, 10 a.m.

The students held a “Valentine’s Day Teddy Bear Drive” to bring love, comfort and cheer to hospitalized children.
 

New UA Otolaryngology Surgeon and Pharmacology Researcher Set to Pursue Breakthroughs for Airway Disorders, Cystic Fibrosis in New Department

Two recent faculty additions at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson’s newest department, Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, have teamed up to pursue innovative research to treat airway disorders like cystic fibrosis (CF) and allow patients – often children – a chance at a better life.

Eugene H. Chang, MD, FACS, has been appointed director of Rhinology and Skull Base Surgery and an associate professor of otolaryngology, while Kwang Chul Kim, PhD, has been appointed director of the Respiratory Mucus Research Program and a professor of otolaryngology research in the UA Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, which became a department at the college in October 2014.

"The recruitment of Drs. Kim and Chang is another step toward building a world class sinonasal and airway program here,” said former interim head of the UA Department of Surgery, Alex Chiu, MD, now chairman of the new department. “Sinusitis affects nearly 15 per cent of the country's population and we’ve already developed a...

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Study Finds Potentially Treatable Cause of Dementia Following Stroke

The development of dementia following a stroke may be due to chronic inflammation in the brain that could be treated with a medication used for rheumatoid arthritis and some cancers, according to a study published in the Feb. 4 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience

Of the 800,000 Americans each year who survive a stroke, nearly one-third develop dementia within a year. Very little is known about inflammation in the brain after stroke, or why some stroke patients develop dementia, a severe decline in mental ability such as memory or thinking skills that can interfere with daily life.

University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson researcher Kristian Doyle, PhD, is first author on the study, “B-Lymphocyte-mediated delayed cognitive impairment following stroke,” which was conducted when he was a post-doctoral scholar in the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine, Calif., under the mentorship of the study’s principal investigator Marion S. Buckwalter, MD, PhD, Stanford assistant professor of neurology and neurosurgery.

“We provide the first...

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