Russell S. Witte, PhD

Professor, Medical Imaging, Optical Sciences, Biomedical Engineering
Professor, Applied Mathematics - GIDP
Professor, Biomedical Engineering - GIDP
Professor, Neuroscience - GIDP

Russell S. Witte, PhD

Academic / Professional Bio: 

Russell Witte received a BS degree with honors in physics from the University of Arizona in Tucson (1993), and a PhD degree in bioengineering from Arizona State University in 2002. Following travel abroad in Europe and Brazil, he began graduate school at Arizona State University in bioengineering. His doctoral thesis exploited chronic microelectrode arrays to describe sensory coding and cortical plasticity in the mammalian brain. He then moved to the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor and joined the Biomedical Ultrasonics Laboratory to develop new contrast mechanisms for imaging especially the brain, nervous, and muscle tissue.Dr. Witte is currently Associate Professor of Medical Imaging, Optical Sciences and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Arizona. To overcome limitations with traditional ultrasound imaging, which typically exhibits poor contrast in soft tissue, his experimental ultrasound laboratory devises and tests novel contrast mechanisms that integrate ultrasound with light, microwaves or electricity.  We work closely with collaborators in the Colleges of Engineering, Optical Sciences and Medicine, as well as industry, to develop cutting-edge imaging technologies that potentially improve patient care. Dr. Witte is also a member of the Arizona Cancer Center, Sarver Heart Center and School of Mind, Brain, and Behavior, as well as the Neuroscience, Applied Mathematics, and Biomedical Engineering graduate interdisciplinary programs (GIDPs).

Research Interests: 

Ultrasound, Thermoacoustics, Biolectricity, Photoacoustics, Elasticity, Microwaves, Functional Brain Imaging, Behavior, Cardiac Imaging, Cancer Imaging, Smart Contrast Agents, Nanotechnology My team develops new imaging methods using a combination of light, ultrasound and microwaves that potentially affect a variety of medical disorders from arrhythmia and epilepsy to cancer and tendinopathy.

Degrees: 
MS: Arizona State University, 2000
PhD: Arizona State University, 2002